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Employment Discrimination

Such discrimination in the workplace is prohibited by federal law for a number of protected categories, including race, gender, religion, age, color, pregnancy, physical disability, and national origin.Additionally, California state law protects workers from being discriminated for reasons of mental or visual disability, medical condition, ancestry, arrest record, marital and military status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and genetic information.

Employment Discrimination

Such discrimination in the workplace is prohibited by federal law for a number of protected categories, including race, gender, religion, age, color, pregnancy, physical disability, and national origin.Additionally, California state law protects workers from being discriminated for reasons of mental or visual disability, medical condition, ancestry, arrest record, marital and military status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and genetic information.

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Bias Can Occur In Various Ways

Such discrimination in the workplace is prohibited by federal law for a number of protected categories, including race, gender, religion, age, color, pregnancy, physical disability, and national origin.Additionally, California state law protects workers from being discriminated for reasons of mental or visual disability, medical condition, ancestry, arrest record, marital and military status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and genetic information.


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Employment Bias

Bias from an employer in hiring (including internships and apprenticeships), job assignment, salary or bonus payments, employee testing and training, pay raises, or employment termination are all prohibited by laws enforced by the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), with additional protections afforded under California state laws and labor codes.


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Obtaining A Right To Sue Letter

Anyone who has been discriminated against by an employer should file a complaint with the EEOC or the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH) as soon as possible. Employees should keep detailed records of the type of discrimination; the date, time, and place of its occurrence; and any other pertinent details. EEOC complaints must be filed within 180 days of the occurrence; DFEH complaints must be filed within a year. 

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Once You Have Filed Your Complaint

Complaints will either result in action by the federal government or the state against the employer or, if either the EEOC or DFEH are unable to solve the issue within a set period of time, the employee can obtain a “right to sue” letter, allowing them to retain legal representation and pursue their complaint via private lawsuit.